Fatima

The 'Grim Sleeper' and Expendable Black Women

 The 'Grim Sleeper' and Expendable Black Women

“The police don’t care because these are Black women.” 

Thirty minutes into documentary filmmaker Nick Broomfield’s latest film, Tales of the Grim Sleeper,we hear these words uttered by Pam, one of the film’s most compelling figures, as she and Bloomfield are driving down the streets of South Central Los Angeles. The documentary follows the case of a South Central serial killer dubbed the Grim Sleeper by the media due to the belief that the killer waited 14 years between murders. Pam is a former sex worker who had multiple dealings with Lonnie Franklin Jr, the man arrested and charged with 10 counts of murder, and one charge of attempted murder. Franklin is believed to be the Grim Sleeper and responsible for the murders of over 100 women and girls (victims’ ages ranged between 14 and 36) in South Central between 1985 and 2010. In the scene preceding Pam’s comment, Broomfield is conversing with Margaret Prescod, founder of the Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders and Laverne Peters, the mother of one of the victims, Janecia Peters. The Coalition has been advocating for justice on behalf of the victims since the 1980s. Earlier in the film when we’re first introduced to her, we see footage showing a younger Prescod handing out leaflets outside of a grocery store as she talks to patrons about the murders of young women that, at the time, have been happening for three years

Grime, Black British identity & Kanye's Brit Awards Performance: an interview with Rianna Jade Parker & Selina Thompson

Grime, Black British identity & Kanye's Brit Awards Performance: an interview with Rianna Jade Parker & Selina Thompson

I was curious about people’s thoughts on Kanye’s Brit Awards performance last week and took to Twitter to hear about people’s reactions, which resulted in some great responses. I also had a chance to check in with the lovely Selina Thompson and Rianna Jade Parker and get their thoughts on the performance, Black British identity, diaspora, and the importance of disrupting white spaces. - Fatima